Wednesday, 15 July 2009

Controlling the internet – Zittrain on Private Sheriffs in Cyberspace - video

This video of a talk by Harvard law professor Jonathan Zittrain, author of 'The Future of the Internet And How to Stop It' and numerous other publications, is a must-see for anyone interested in the regulation or control of the internet and its content, whether by legislative or other means, or the future of the Net or indeed technology generally.

The talk is entertaining and informative at the same time. It’s aimed at UK lawyers, so non-technical viewers won’t get lost. (Lawyers who are technologically minded will have to forgive my assumption that lawyers are non-technical!)

In this video Prof Zittrain “discusses the ways in which online life will be regulated largely by people and institutions bearing no badges or government affiliation.

Do private sheriffs help avoid cumbersome and ill-considered government intervention, or do they represent a new form of vigilante justice with none of the protections associated with the rule of law?”

The video is of a talk he gave on 19 May 2009 in London for the Oxford Internet Institute and Society for Computers & the Law.

Note that the description and video recording are reproduced from the SCL site, where they are licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License.

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-NoDerivs 3.0 License

I believe that it won’t be a breach of the "no derivatives" condition to upload the video to Blip.tv so that I canenable others to embed or link to the video if they wish, without extra strain on the SCL servers. But I’m still trying to learn fully how CC and indeed embedding work, so if I’m wrong and there's an issue, please let me know and I'll delete it.

Note: updated to link to the video page rather than embed it as it doesn't seem to work well after publishing.

©WH. This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial Share-Alike England 2.0 Licence. Please attribute to WH, Tech and Law, and link to the original blog post page. Moral rights asserted.